Services

Hip Surgery

A hip fracture is a break in the top of the femur (thighbone) where the bone angles toward the hip joint. If the break occurs within two inches of the joint, it is called a femoral neck fracture. If it occurs between two and four inches from the joint, it is known as an intertrochanteric fracture. (A break further down the bone is classified as a broken femur rather than a broken hip.) Femoral neck fractures require more extensive surgery.

Hip fractures usually make it too painful for the person to stand. The leg may turn outward or shorten. They generally require hospitalization and surgical repair.

A person’s risk for suffering a hip fracture increases if he or she is over 65, female, or small-boned; has a family history of hip fractures; has osteoporosis or low calcium, which leads to bone weakness; smokes or uses alcohol excessively; is physically or mentally impaired; or takes medications that cause weakness or dizziness. Hip fractures are a common and serious problem for the elderly, for whom a simple fall in the home may be enough to break the bone.


Knee Pain Treatment / Foot Pain Treatment

The constant use of the lower extremities makes them an easy target for injury and pain, specifically in the knees and feet. Walking, sitting and standing all put pressure on our knees and feet, while most athletic activities rely on them as well. Knee and foot pain are common ailments that affect thousands of people in the US each year. These symptoms may be a result of the same condition or can be completely separate. It is important to determine the source of the pain in order to successfully treat these conditions.


Knee Structure

The knee is a hinge joint that connects the thigh bone (femur) to the lower leg bones (tibia and fibula) and the kneecap (patella). Like other joints in the body, the knee is made up of tendons and ligaments, as well as cartilage structures like menisci and bursae. The tendons and ligaments provide strength and stability and allow the knee to evenly carry the weight of the body, while the cartilage structures allow for smooth, fluid movements.


Shoulder Dislocation Treatment

The shoulder is a “ball-and-socket” joint where the “ball” is the rounded top of the arm bone (humerus) and the “socket” is the cup (glenoid) of the shoulder blade. A layer of cartilage called the labrum cushions and deepens the socket. A dislocation occurs when the humerus pops out of its socket, either partially or completely. As the body’s most mobile joint, able to move in many directions, the shoulder is most vulnerable to dislocation.

Dislocation causes pain and unsteadiness in the shoulder. Other symptoms may include swelling, numbness, weakness and bruising. The majority of dislocations occur when the humerus slips forward, a condition called anterior instability. This may happen during a throwing motion. The humerus is also capable of dislocating backwards or downwards. In most cases, the dislocated shoulder can be manipulated back into place by a doctor in a process known as closed reduction.

Complications of shoulder dislocation or reduction can include a labrum or cartilage tear, a lesion on the glenoid bone after the humerus strikes it, tendon or ligament injuries, and blood vessel and nerve damage. Shoulders that have dislocated once are more likely to dislocate in the future, potentially resulting in chronic shoulder instability and weakness.


Sports Medicine

Sports medicine is a subspecialty of orthopedics that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries suffered during athletic activity. The goal of treatment is to heal and rehabilitate the injury so patients can return to their favorite activities quickly, whether it’s Little League, recreational play or a high school, college or professional sport.

Because of the frequent use, wear-and-tear and risk of a fall or accident associated with sports activities, athletes are often susceptible to orthopedic injuries, including a stress fracture, chronic pain, or a tearing or stretching of internal structures. Different activities place different areas at a higher risk for damage, so it’s important to take the necessary precautions to protect yourself while playing sports. Treatment for these conditions may involve surgery, orthotics, physical therapy and rest.


Specialized Care

As with a sports team, there are many physicians who work together to help the patient regain maximum use of the injured limb or joint. “Players” on the team are typically the physician, orthopedic surgeon, rehabilitation specialist, athletic trainer and physical therapist – and the patient him/herself. Dr. Omey has specialized training in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of sports injuries, and can help athletes return to their favorite activities as quickly as possible through the most advanced, minimally invasive treatments available.

Common injuries treated include:

  • ACL Tears
  • Compartment Syndrome
  • Fractures
  • Heat Exhaustion
  • Muscle Contusions (Bruise)
  • Muscle Cramps
  • Shin Splints
  • Sprains & Strains
  • Stress Fractures
  • Torn Tendons & Ligaments

It is important to seek proper medical care at the first sign of a sports injury, as continued use and activity can lead to even more damage. We understand your desire to return to physical activity as soon as possible, and offer a wide range of treatment options to heal your injury and protect you from future injuries as well.


Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that allows doctors to diagnose and sometimes treat joint injuries and disease through small incisions in the skin. It is often performed to confirm a diagnosis made after a physical examination and other imaging tests such as MRI, CT scan or X-rays. During an arthroscopic procedure, a thin fiberoptic light, magnifying lens and tiny television camera are inserted into the problem area, allowing the doctor to examine the joint in great detail.

For some patients it is then possible to treat the problem using this approach or with a combination of arthroscopic and “open” surgery. Sports injuries are often repairable with arthroscopy. Tendon tears in the knee are frequently repaired in this way. Other potentially treatable injuries include torn cartilage or ligaments, inflamed joint lining, carpal tunnel syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and loose bone or cartilage.

Because it is minimally invasive, arthroscopy offers many benefits to the patient over traditional surgery:

  • No cutting of muscles or tendons
  • Less bleeding during surgery
  • Less scarring
  • Smaller incisions
  • Faster recovery and return to regular activities
  • Faster and more comfortable rehabilitation

Arthroscopy is not appropriate for every patient. Dr. Omey will discuss the diagnostic and treatment options that are best for you.


Bracing

Bracing is a valuable treatment method for certain orthopedic conditions. A brace works to restrict movement and relieve pressure. This can promote healing, take weight off of an injured area, provide post-operative support and more. Braces are commonly used to support the spine, knee, ankle and elbow.

Dr. Omey may recommend bracing to treat:

  • Spinal fracture
  • Spinal trauma
  • Scoliosis
  • Kyphosis
  • Knee pain due to a torn ACL or patellar tendonitis
  • Chronic ankle instability
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Cavus foot

Additionally, bracing is sometimes recommended for use during sports, especially among adolescents or those with previous injuries. Braces can stabilize the joint, particularly the knee or ankle, and help prevent stress-related problems from occurring during high-impact activities.


Prevention

In order to prevent sports injuries from occurring, it is important for athletes to take care of themselves before, during and after physical activity. This helps to ensure long-term athletic health. Some of the most effective injury prevention tips include:

  • Staying hydrated
  • Taking time to rest
  • Don’t work out on an empty stomach
  • Warm up before exercising
  • Gradually increasing activity level

Athletes should see a doctor on a regular basis to ensure that they are performing at their peak level and to detect any problems in their earliest stages. Continuing to exercise or play sports with an injury can significantly worsen the severity of the condition.

To learn more about our sports medicine services, please call us today to schedule an appointment with one of our specialists.

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